Flower Power

Erodium cicutarium
Erodium cicutarium

Have you ever gotten up-close and personal with any of those tiny flowers you find growing wild in your back yard or that have crept into your garden space to nestle alongside your Narcissus and Phlox?

Oxalyis stricta
Oxalyis stricta

I decided to do just that over the past few days.

Veronica persica
Veronica persica

It’s amazing what we trod upon as we go about our daily business.

Taraxacum officinale
Taraxacum officinale

Are these plants somehow not as important as those we lovingly cultivate through seeds, bulbs or cuttings?

Nothoscordum bivalve
Nothoscordum bivalve

In some cases, probably not.

Lamium amplexicaule
Lamium amplexicaule

Some of these small flowering plants are considered to be invasives. If not actually invasive, they may still be non-natives.

Senecio vulgaris
Senecio vulgaris

And most of them are probably referred to with that dreaded word — weed.

Stellaria media
Stellaria media

Whatever they may be considered — wildflower, weed, native, invasive — they’re still quite beautiful close up.

 

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19 thoughts on “Flower Power

      • Its funny we see these as weeds. I read an article recently about medieval vegetable gardening and it suggested people used to have a very different relationship to these kinds of plants. Anything edible was considered a pot herb and left them grow next to their cultivated plants. They were valuable because they come up so early in spring and are loaded with minerals and vitamins just when people really need them after a long winter that may have been low on fresh greens.

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  1. Some days it is the teeny tiny flowers that charm me the most. Especially when they are drawing in the tiny butterflies they serve as host plants to and for. Under those circumstance, the word “weed” simply does not apply. At least not in my back yard!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I know the bees and other bugs rely on these “weeds” to supplement their nectar needs, so I don’t worry myself too much about trying to uproot them or mow them down immediately (of course I at least try to get to it before they go to seed and take over the garden!).

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