Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day: April 2015

This is my first post for Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day, hosted by Carol and her blog May Dreams Gardens. I had a lot of fun today as I wandered through the garden, taking photos and paying a little closer attention than usual to the flowers! Most of the blooms in my garden this month seem to be Iris. While the white blooms have come and gone, the purple and lavender varieties have come to stay for a while. Irises do so well in our hot, dry conditions that I continually dig and replant them to increase the size of their beds.

I purchased a six-pack of Texas Bluebonnets (Lupinus texensis) earlier in the spring and divided them between two locations in my garden, planting half in the back yard and half in the side yard.

This Bridal Wreath Spiraea (Spiraea prunifolia) was really nipped by a freeze a number of weeks ago just as it started to bud out. I didn’t expect it to rebound and actually bloom, but it did and the flowers are just magnificent!

Bridal Wreath Spiraea (Spiraea prunifolia)
Bridal Wreath Spiraea (Spiraea prunifolia)

While this plant isn’t a native to Texas, I did decide to plant a couple more in the front yard, along with a bed of Daylilies and some Iris. The more drought-tolerant plants in the yard, the less water is necessary to keep everything alive.

Bridal Wreath Spiraea (Spiraea prunifolia)
Bridal Wreath Spiraea (Spiraea prunifolia)

This is the lone Columbine (Aquilegia vulgaris) in my garden. The plant information that came with it indicated that it was a ‘Winky Blue-White’.  I don’t think so… But it’s still very pretty!

Columbine (Aquilegia vulgaris)
Columbine (Aquilegia vulgaris)

Here’s a pot of Dianthus. I planted these last spring and they made it through the winter in great shape. From far away they look more like a multicolored shrub than garden variety flowers.

Dianthus
Dianthus

These English Wallflowers (Cheiranthus cheri) grew from some seeds I planted last fall.

English Wallflower (Cheiranthus cheiri)
English Wallflower (Cheiranthus cheiri)

These pretty Blue Flax (Linum perenne) ‘Blue Sapphire’ are growing nestled beneath a tree.

Blue Flax (Linum perenne) 'Blue Sapphire'
Blue Flax (Linum perenne) ‘Blue Sapphire’

Pink Wood Sorrel (Oxalis crassipes ‘Rosea’) is among the earliest bloomers in my garden. The small flowers last well into summer, before the extreme heat basically dries the plants up. When fall returns, so do the plants and the blooms.

Pink Wood Sorrel (Oxalis crassipes ‘Rosea’)
Pink Wood Sorrel (Oxalis crassipes ‘Rosea’)

Several Pink Evening Primrose (Oenothera rosea) were in bloom today, the first of the season. These flowers — also known as Rose of Mexico — are native to Texas and northern Mexico.

Pink Evening Primrose (Oenothera rosea)
Pink Evening Primrose (Oenothera rosea)

This Rose Pink Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii ‘Rose Pink’) just began blooming this week. It will continue to bloom throughout the summer. Bees love these plants. Salvia greggii is native to Texas and parts of Mexico. It is very drought-tolerant and has wonderfully aromatic leaves.

Rose Pink Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii 'Rose Pink')
Rose Pink Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii ‘Rose Pink’)

I added this little plant — Salvia ‘May Night’ (Salvia nemorosa ‘Mainacht’) to my garden last fall. It was a pitiful looking end-of-season markdown and I wasn’t sure it would even reappear this spring, but it did! It’s another drought-tolerant perennial that loves the sun.

Salvia 'May Night' (Salvia nemorosa 'Mainacht')
Salvia ‘May Night’ (Salvia nemorosa ‘Mainacht’)

Another perennial I added to the garden last fall is this Pincushion Flower ‘Butterfly Blue’ (Scabiosa columbaria ‘Butterfly Blue’). It’s sort of strange-looking, isn’t it? I can certainly see how it got its name!

Pincushion Flower 'Butterfly Blue' (Scabiosa columbaria 'Butterfly Blue')
Pincushion Flower ‘Butterfly Blue’ (Scabiosa columbaria ‘Butterfly Blue’)

That’s it for this month! I hope to have some different bloomers next time. If you’re interested in seeing what might be flowering in other folks gardens be sure to visit May Dreams Gardens.

 

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38 thoughts on “Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day: April 2015

  1. Everything is looking wonderful. The irises are always so spectacular and yours are no exception!!! The dianthus are stunning – they bloom all year for me, but are prolific during spring and autumn.

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  2. I am loving all the different irises you have going. They are so lovely and along with spirea have always reminded me of the old-fashioned southern gardens I loved as a child. I grow both here, along with althea bushes, as reminders of gardens and gardeners long gone.

    That dianthus is stunning – mine struggled in last summer’s heat and then were bitten by freezing weather. We’ll see if they survive another summer or succumb. Lots of folks around Austin treat them as annuals but yours show what great results a little more patience can reveal.

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  3. Your irises have spectacular blooms. You are succeeding with a cottage garden look with a nod to water conservation, good job.

    Are those the dianthus usually treated as annuals, or the biennial Sweet William, Dianthus barbatus? Either way, they are lovely and fun to keep going.

    Spiraea also has several cultivars, yours being the pretty one with blooms that look like tiny roses.

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  4. Hi,

    That Spirea is very impressive! I’ve seen it on another blog and decided I’d get it, but seeing your photos really has made me want one!! I wonder if it’s available over this side of the pond? Often things available in the US aren’t in the UK, unfortunately.

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  5. Great job on your first GBBD post. You have some gorgeous blooms to share. I just loved your Irises and your Spiraea, but your Blue Flax stole my heart. Absolutely beautiful.

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  6. Your post reminded me of my favorite lupines in New Zealand. They are so tall and very healthy in their wild habitat in the woods. They are so different from those i’ve seen before in Sweden and Turkey. I also particularly love the different colors.

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    • While our drought continues, we’ve been lucky to have some good spring rains. Nothing to brag about or to fill the lakes from, but enough to keep things growing and to bring out some plants we haven’t seen in a couple of years. It’s actually raining as I speak. It’s been teasing us for the last few days, raining in every direction except right on top of us, but I guess it felt sorry for us and decided to send a few drops! We need a week of continuous steady downpours to make any difference at all in our water supply.

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  7. Your irises and bluebonnets are looking fantastic as well! The color of your columbine is stunning! I just have the Texas Gold variety that is blooming for the first time for me this year. Your spiraea is beautiful. Is it very fragrant (it definitely looks to be).

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  8. Mmm … lots of floral goodness, including a great variety of iris. That mass of Dianthus looks really lovely. I just sowed some Wallflowers, I hope they end up looking as good as yours.

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  9. Your garden is filled with such beauty. Stunning Iris! Mine are reaching for the sky, but I really enjoyed all your photos of your garden-lovely:-) I am inspired + excited but today it is in the 40’s….a bit below normal, sure hope we get to where you are!

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