Tree Following: June 2015

I’m following a tree with Lucy at Loose and Leafy. The 7th of each month is set aside for those taking part in Tree Following to post an update on their tree. I’m actually a few days late with my post — but that’s okay! — because anyone interested in joining Lucy has until the 14th of each month to let everyone know what’s been happening with their tree. Join in if you haven’t already!

My tree — a Shumard Oak (Quercus shumardii) — looks basically the same as it did last month. Not a lot is going on with it right now! Maybe it’s filled in a little more? Kind of hard to tell.

I’ve been really surprised that no birds or squirrels have made this tree their home (at least as far as I can tell). We have two other Shumard Oaks and they’re teeming with wildlife. Perhaps as this one continues to grow it will attract a following!

Since the tree itself hasn’t really undergone any noticeable changes, I decided to focus on it’s leaves, fruit and bark this month.

It appears that small acorns have begun to form! Their small, dark masses are apparent on the right in the photo below, nestled within a mass of glowing leaves.

Shumard Oak (Quercus shumardii) Acorns
Shumard Oak (Quercus shumardii) Acorns

Here is a closer view of the forming acorns.

Shumard Oak (Quercus shumardii) Acorns
Shumard Oak (Quercus shumardii) Acorns

Last month I posted a photo of a gall that had formed on one of the tree’s leaves (one of many, actually!). The gall is still there and, like the tree itself, hasn’t shown any obvious changes.

Oak Gall
Oak Gall

Various fungi appeared on the trunk of my tree during our wet, wet, wet month of May. Here are a couple photos that appear to show some lichen and perhaps some small dark-colored mushrooms.

Fungi on Tree Trunk
Fungi on Tree Trunk

The mushrooms are on the right in the top photo and on the left in the bottom photo. These enchanting organisms have all disappeared as dry, hot weather has set in.

Fungi on Tree Trunk
Fungi on Tree Trunk

That does it for this month’s Tree Following post! To join in, head over to Lucy’s website Loose and Leafy.

treefollowingI’m Following a Tree

 

 

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24 thoughts on “Tree Following: June 2015

  1. Love your trees (and mine, too!). I’m glad you have a picture of the oak gall, as they are ubiquitous in shumards. I notice lots of smaller, dead branches on one of my Shumards, but not the other. Have you noticed this in any of yours?

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    • I really love having these trees, too. They’re just wonderful! We seem to get the small dead branches and twigs every year. Usually a big wind will blow them down. I’m not sure if it has something to do with how dry its been over the last few years or if its just normal. They do get awfully thick and bushy once the leaves are all out, so maybe all the branches don’t get enough sun and some die off?

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  2. Beautiful images – I’m not familiar with this particular species, although I would recognise it as a Quercus from the leaf shape, and I would expect it to be a lovely red in autumn – we have something similar in front of our city railway station here in Cardiff.
    A trick of the light almost made the lichen on the bark seem rainbow-coloured when I first looked at your pictures. Pretty, anyway.
    All the best 🙂

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  3. It was wonderful to have lichen and fungi showing up here during our wet May, wasn’t it! Great shots and I’m betting it will all be back once we get to cooler wetter times of the year. That is interesting that you have the one oak that doesn’t have nests or a lot of wildlife activity. Perhaps it is some sort of shared resource, or potentially simply isn’t populated yet? I’ll be looking to hear more…

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    • I don’t know the reason. The squirrels do romp through the tree on their way to another tree or to the roof of the house, and the goldfinches liked it during the winter because their feeders hung from it, but during the summer there are no nests. Maybe the birds don’t nest there because there’s human activity so close to it during the day.

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