Snow On The Mountain: Strictly Out Of The Ordinary

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata) is one of the few late summer plants that grows well in my garden. They’ve been in bloom for a couple of weeks now, adding at least a little color to my barren landscape. For information on this flower please see my post from earlier this year.

The close-up below highlights the intricate detail of the plant’s small flower clusters.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

Here’s an even closer view. These flowers measure only about 3/8 of an inch across. If you don’t look closely at this plant you might miss the blooms altogether, as the most striking part of it remains the variegated white and green leaves.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

The seeds of Euphorbia marginata take a while to form and dry. I usually end up picking the small pods off the plant and crushing them so I can drop the seeds where I’d like them to come up. The number of plants that come up in my garden doesn’t change much from one year to the next, so I’m guessing the rate of germination for these seeds isn’t very high.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

Though small, the flowers do attract pollinators. Most of my plants, as they get larger, seem to be inhabited by a spider or two, also.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata) is a great addition to any garden, especially for those of us who must put up with hot, dry summers. They’re drought-tolerant and at this time of the year they brighten up an area that has reverted to mostly foliage.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
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18 thoughts on “Snow On The Mountain: Strictly Out Of The Ordinary

    • You’re welcome. I hope you find some seeds and you have plants next summer. They’re really difficult to wait on, because they start coming up early and don’t bloom until this time of year. You can actually almost watch them grow from one day to the next, so they’re fun plants to have.

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  1. Your macros are fantastic! So worth a closer look. Snow on the mountain also makes a good cut flower, but the sap can cause skin sensitivity. I think its variegation really sets off an arrangement.

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  2. Gorgeous! I wish I had full sun areas to offer because I’d be thrilled to get these in play with their variegated foliage and delicate blossoms. Even though we are mostly part-shade here I think I’ll look for seeds and see if I can’t find a spot to work these in. Thanks for bringing them into the “light”!

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    • I’m sure they’ll probably do just fine in partial shade. During their early growing period I always have to watch them and give them a drink at times, especially when we go a long period between rains, because they do tend to get a bit limp in the very extreme heat before they’ve accustomed themselves to it. So a little shade wouldn’t hurt. Most of mine actually get some late afternoon shade from the shadow of the house as the sun heads west.

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  3. Drat. It looks like a shade loving plant which is what I am constantly seeking. I guess I will just have to admire it from afar. Really beautiful photos!

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