Snow On The Mountain: Strictly Out Of The Ordinary

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata) is one of the few late summer plants that grows well in my garden. They’ve been in bloom for a couple of weeks now, adding at least a little color to my barren landscape. For information on this flower please see my post from earlier this year.

The close-up below highlights the intricate detail of the plant’s small flower clusters.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

Here’s an even closer view. These flowers measure only about 3/8 of an inch across. If you don’t look closely at this plant you might miss the blooms altogether, as the most striking part of it remains the variegated white and green leaves.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

The seeds of Euphorbia marginata take a while to form and dry. I usually end up picking the small pods off the plant and crushing them so I can drop the seeds where I’d like them to come up. The number of plants that come up in my garden doesn’t change much from one year to the next, so I’m guessing the rate of germination for these seeds isn’t very high.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

Though small, the flowers do attract pollinators. Most of my plants, as they get larger, seem to be inhabited by a spider or two, also.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata) is a great addition to any garden, especially for those of us who must put up with hot, dry summers. They’re drought-tolerant and at this time of the year they brighten up an area that has reverted to mostly foliage.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
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My Garden This Week

March 21, 2015

Spring is finally here and the garden is beginning to come to life. Above are photos of the flowers and buds that brightened the past week. I discovered the Grape Hyacinth (Muscari armeniacum) just this morning. For the past several years they’ve barely shown themselves and have disappeared before having a chance to even bloom.

Leaf buds, seedlings and sprouts have been making an appearance this week as well. The Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (top row) is a cutting that I rooted late last summer and planted in the fall. It’s not much to look at right now but it will grow quickly once the warm weather decides to stick around. I was surprised to see the Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata) seedlings already up (middle row). There are quite a few of them scattered around several flower beds. And at least one Turk’s Cap (Malvaviscus arboreus) is showing leaf buds (bottom row).

Evergreen Tree Seedling
Evergreen Tree Seedling

Here is a small evergreen tree seedling that I found at the base of another tree last summer. I transplanted it to another area and managed to keep it alive. It’s doing quite well and has a beautiful color. Hopefully one day I’ll be able to identify it.

Tree Branches and Rain
Tree Branches and Rain

We had some very beneficial rain on Thursday. The weather service only measured about a quarter of an inch, but we received about three quarters of an inch at our house. It’s also been raining lightly this evening. No drought-busters but welcome nonetheless.

The past week was a good one for my garden. I can’t wait to see what the next seven days will bring!

Snow On The Mountain: Euphorbia Marginata

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata) is a slow growing, self-seeding annual. These plants have been growing in my garden for a number of years, though I’m not entirely certain where they came from! I’ve noticed several wild plots of them in some rural areas nearby, so it’s possible the seeds were carried here by birds.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

Euphorbia marginata is one of the later plants to make an appearance in the garden, usually popping up when I’ve given up all hope that they’re going to return. They never seem to come up in the same location from one season to the next. I guess it depends upon which way the wind is blowing when their seeds finally decide to drop! I’ve tried to arrange these photos (these are actually a couple of different plants that I took pictures of last year) in the order of the their growth pattern.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

Euphorbia marginata is a succulent plant in the spurge family, of which the Poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) is also a member.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

All parts of Euphorbia marginata are poisonous if ingested. The sap can cause a rash or burns to the skin and eyes comparable to a Latex reaction, as well as blistering of the mouth. Just handling the leaves can cause skin irritation. I’ve never had contact with the sap, and have not experienced any irritation from touching the leaves or flowers, so the plant probably affects different people in different ways.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

The foliage of Euphorbia marginata is more eye-catching that its flowers. While the lower leaves of the main stem remain totally green, the leaves at the top of the plant are patterned with white margins and in some cases are almost fully white. The same can be said of the leaves surrounding flowers lower down the main stem. The plants grow to a height of 1½-3 feet and a width of about 12 inches.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

In contrast to the vivid quality of the leaves, the flowers are inconspicuous and easy to overlook. The small greenish-white clusters of blossoms seem to get lost in the deep green and white of the surrounding foliage. But if you inspect them closely you’ll find that they’re quite pretty.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

Snow On The Mountain blooms from mid-summer through fall. It’s always one of the last flowers standing in my garden.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

Seed capsules form as the blooms begin to dry and fall off. They’re a little bigger than a large pin-head and somewhat irregularly round. Each capsule contains three seeds. The capsules remain green for quite a while before slowly browning and falling off.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

Euphorbia marginata is very drought tolerant. It will withstand extreme heat with only moderate watering and will grow in complete sun to partial shade.

Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)
Snow On The Mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

This plant was first noted by the Lewis and Clark Expedition along the Yellowstone River in Montana. It is a Texas native.

Other common names for Euphorbia marginata are Ghostweed, Kilimanjaro, Snow Top, Summer Icicle, Smoke on the Prairie, Variegated Spurge, Whitemargined Spurge and Mountain Spurge.